six social media predictions for 2013

6 Social Media Predictions for 2013

December 27, 2012 ·

by Nick Cicero

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As the year comes to a close, it is time to start looking toward 2013 and the next wave of social media.

six social media predictions for 2013

This year we saw an explosion of social adoption by brand and consumers alike, specifically in the way content is created and consumed.

With the significant rise in mobile adoption, and a huge upswing in the number of content creators, what should brands and publishers in general be looking for as the new year hits?

Our team members and trusted partners weigh in with their thoughts.

Jordan Kretchmer, Livefyre, Founder and CEO

In 2013 I think that we’ll start to see static content become richer and more real-time. the ability to create and curate multimedia content from around the web in real-time, means content will become richer, more interactive, and more timely. Think about it like the old CD-rom versions of the Encarta Encyclopedia, except now stories will be told seamlessly with video, audio, text, images, social data, and of course user interaction, all updated instantly as new relevant information becomes available. I don’t just see this happening for blogs and news sites, I see this transition happening for long-form fiction and non-fiction as well. I think the days of the text-only e-reader (Kindle, Nook) are numbered, to be replaced by what I call content experiences.

A good example of this kind of content experience was the original version of Qwiki. They’ve since changed focus to be for personal use which I think was a move away from the trend. Fast forward to 1min 45sec to see a primitive version of a content experience in action.

Robyn Peterson, Mashable, CTO

Think social first, then search. Your audience shares content, and they share it a lot. According to Pew, 41% of adult Internet users take photos or videos that they found online and repost them on sites designed for sharing images with many people. These social shares impact SEO.

Having a “social strategy” isn’t enough. And, a “social media strategist” should be everyone in your organization, not just one warm body. Build social into your product from the ground up.

Nick Cicero, Livefyre, Social Strategist

2013 will be the year the “click-and-get” economy explodes, or an increased appetite for content in the now. In the next year content creation will significantly increase by brands, which we are already starting to see, and the conversations created from socially-powered campaigns will move from living on the major external social networks alone to brand-hosted spaces.

Kevin Spidel, Voice Media Group, Director of Community Engagement 

More than ever, this year campaigns and social engagement will be cross channel and built on more than just user generated content. Relevant brand engagement across many channels, not just a focus on one or a few. This means more noise within the social web that brand managers will need to sift through. Social engagement points will be built off moments such Open Graph actions and check ins. More actions, more content, more noise. Semantic and Social CRM tools that help connect a brand to relevant ACTIONS and content with their consumers and cut through the noise will be the trend this year.

Ben Goering, Livefyre, Product Manager

The industry has learned a lot over the past few years about how to make engaging web products like Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. In 2013, the lessons taught by these successes will be spread throughout the web to publishers, brand sites, and every other content community, making the whole Internet a lot more fun. This includes cross-device distribution, real-time tech, and leveraging new web standards for entirely new types of social interactions and consumption.

Jenna Langer, Livefyre, VP Customer Experience

2013 will be the year media companies fully invest in real-time storytelling, with the help of surrounding communities and social media to break news. Users will still have many places to turn for new information, but now will be able to consume and engage with more specialized and localized content curated by their favorite outlets.

While these are only the thoughts of a few, we believe that 2013 will be a huge year for media in general. Between the rise in spending, influx of content, and widespread adoption of social networks, it will be a competitive year for all companies creating content and building communities online.

What surprised you in 2012 in your community or the digital landscape? What trends are you looking for in 2013? Let us know in the comments below and let’s start a discussion.

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52 comments
lema
lema

i would like to see more really story telling  tech for media......

nickcicero
nickcicero

@bluewaxy interesting in a good way or bad? :)

BillLazdowski
BillLazdowski

Moving to multiple platforms for a broader outlook vs focusing on one is what I believe will be key on 2013

Jenna Langer
Jenna Langer

2013 is going to be a crazy one! Maybe CES will give me some more insight :)

Meghan Krane
Meghan Krane

Would love to see more real-time storytelling tech for journalists.

nickcicero
nickcicero

@jumpset_tweets thanks for sharing the article!

jmitchem
jmitchem

Content is still king. Regardless of which medium you push it into. If it's sharable, it will be shared. SEO is almost an organic strategy for us. 

solaveivision
solaveivision

kudos to those who are able to utilize Twitter for their marketing campaigns, because frankly, aside from the use by corporations to further 'brand' themselves, i don't see Twitter as anything but a quick way to get 'breaking news' out to masses in seconds.

Lynn OConnell
Lynn OConnell

2013 needs to bring significant improvements in content curation and experience. We no longer have a fire hose of information coming at us -- it's more like 4 tsunamis, one from each direction, all colliding with us in the middle. That's not sustainable as social media needs to be a painless communication channel. The good news? There are HUGE opportunities here for the programmers who figure out how to give us what we want, when we want it... for curators who help shape the waves into narrative... for artists who merge TV/radio/news/movies/games into new interactive entertainment experiences. I expect to see lots of content experiments this year.

BuddyHodges
BuddyHodges

Decades ago mechanical engineers began to pay attention to "human factors." Aeronautical engineers considered pilots when designing cockpit controls. In the 21st century phones are becoming almost too "smart" for the average user. The exciting advances in communication technology, and proliferation of social network platforms, raise the internet learning curve beyond the capacity of many real humans who have other work to do as well. There is a huge need to simplify, organize and curate and review.


kdouga
kdouga

The challenge still remains to draw a meaningful audience among those millions of tweets and posts. Once you find your message, social media is a great place to build that audience. Sadly, I think may people try to find their message like a focus group test, with little or no success. 

truthtrance
truthtrance

Customer enjoyment born both from new, more powerful smartphone and tablet hardware and also from easier-to-use software interfaces will continue to dominate the social media growth curves through 2013.  We are still in the wild, wild West of social media integration with big developments yet to impact the marketplace.

left_the_stars
left_the_stars

I am expecting a major fallout with facebook, the trend for paying to promote a post or make sure a message arrives seems to me like the facebook imperium is crumbeling

haroldgardner
haroldgardner

I wonder about usability improvements.  It seems that most every site wants to 'capture' the content and even more the person.  If someone who interests me posts anywhere, I want to see it.  I don't want to chase through twitter streams, FB profiles, or G+ to figure it out.  If someone reacts to me, I don't want email or to go back to my original post or comment, I just want to know.  The company that figures this out, will capture the SoMe marketplace.

rjfrasca
rjfrasca

I couldn't agree more with Jordan Kretchmer,in regards to static content becoming richer and more real-time. This is long overdue and I think just now being widely accepted as the only way to move forward. Great article!

Latest blog post: Resume

TracyKauffman
TracyKauffman

Social media is a great way to communicate with people around the world.  Can't wait to see what's in store for this year.

Tim Berkesch
Tim Berkesch

I agree that 2013 will be a huge year for social media - the question is which platform will be the most effective!

RafalKuz
RafalKuz

Curious to see how many of these visions will turn into reality.

kspidel
kspidel

@TrulyChes hahaha right NOW?!?! Kidding! #besos.

nickcicero
nickcicero

@gourmetbachelor @Livefyre @robynpeterson @kspidel thanks Chad, hope you were able to take something from the article.

jkretch
jkretch moderator

The New York Times just launched an awesome project that exemplifies a Content Experience better than anything I've seen to date. It's beautiful, and I think we'll see a whole lot more like this over the next year. The one thing it's missing is the social content/real-time updates component, which in this case makes perfect sense. Check it out: http://www.nytimes.com/projects/2012/snow-fall/#/?part=tunnel-creek

nickcicero
nickcicero moderator

@jmitchem I would modify and then agree with you that: 1. good content is king 2. bad content puts you in the jester's court.

jennalanger
jennalanger moderator

@BuddyHodges My mom just got an iPhone. So you think by the end of 2013 she'll finally know how to use it? :)

tammikibler
tammikibler

@haroldgardner Bottlenose is putting together something like that, though the beta I tested is a huge processing drain. I agree, whoever pulls all our channels together will win.

jennalanger
jennalanger moderator

@RafalKuz We'll have to do a post in a few months and then again later tracking this!

nickcicero
nickcicero moderator

@Will Foster Great question William. I'd like to think that social media can certainly change foreign policy. As we have seen with the events causing the Arab Spring, Occupy Wall Street, and even more recently with the controversy surrounding the Youtube Video and the Benghazi  Consulate attack, people increasingly understand that social plays a key role in connecting the public to each other, their governments, and even internationally from government to government. 

International relations in general can (and do) happen on any platform now, and I can believe that the Assistant Secretary's prediction will definitely take shape soon. 

TrulyChes
TrulyChes

@kspidel Yes... Only... now. :p

kspidel
kspidel

@nickcicero @gourmetbachelor @livefyre @robynpeterson appears we all agree, content will be more & so will noise. We need to cut through it

jennalanger
jennalanger moderator

@jkretch I definitely just scrolled through to look at the media, and now I'm more inclined to go back and read it. Guess that's the point!

ben
ben moderator

@jkretch That is so awesome! Good work NYT crew!

jennalanger
jennalanger moderator

@nickcicero @Will Foster That part that I'm interested in is how the larger media companies have and will continue to use content they find on social media to make stories national news. The real question is how the government is using social media in the background to monitor what's happening around the world. I know @mdeparini has some thoughts on this too.

nickcicero
nickcicero

@kspidel @gourmetbachelor @livefyre @robynpeterson agreed

mdeparini1
mdeparini1 moderator

@jennalanger @nickcicero @Will Foster @mdeparini The Government is sinking in millions to answer that question.   As taken from the government's R&D department :

"With the spread of blogs, social networking sites and media-sharing technology, the conditions under which our military forces conduct operations are rapidly changing. These conditions and speed with which information is pass are further accelerated by proliferation of mobile technology. Addressing the implications of these trends is part of preventing strategic surprise. DARPA’s mission is to prevent such surprise."

As a person who worked on that project, I can say with some certainty that the openness of social media in the upcoming years will be changing quite a bit.

meghankrane
meghankrane moderator

@jennalanger @kspidel @ben @jnavin @nickcicero @jkretch The NYT did a great job of guiding the viewer through a presentation of content here, but there was never any prompt for action on behalf of the viewer for further engagement. There is a lot of opportunity in online journalism for improvement - we need to be just as artful in guiding our audiences into engagement as we are at presenting them with content. 

jennalanger
jennalanger moderator

@kspidel @ben @jnavin @nickcicero @jkretch Interestingly enough they don't even have on page engagement - they send you away to another page for comments. Granted that page has over 1k comments, I think there are some great opportunities to add interaction directly on this page.

jnavin
jnavin

@nickcicero @ben @jkretch Really beautifully executed.  NYT should do a follow up article about the production of that article.  How they did it?  Which software?  Which other tools?  That'd be as interesting as the article.  And, it was a great article.